Santa Barbara Residence | In-Progress

Ongoing renovation of an existing single story residence in Santa Barbara, CA. Architect: Andrulaitis+Mixon, general contractor: Hall Contracting Corp.

BEFORE + IN-PROGRESS

BEFORE: 1950’s facade, Ulmus parviflolia in poor health

IN-PROGRESS: residence under construction, removed trees will be replaced with native Quercus agrifolia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BEFORE: dueling sandstone retaining walls

IN-PROGRESS: partial retaining wall demolition, lower finish grade provides better visibility at driveway

 

GRADING & SITE PREP

permeable wood decking in-progress, structural engineer: Hume Engineers

salvaged sandstone set aside for re-use in the new retaining wall system

uncovered large boulder will be integrated into the new retaining wall system

temporary erosion control on the newly contoured front slope


WLAM | Landscape Architecture Myth Busting – Part 2

Part 2: More myth-busting as we continue to address common misconceptions about landscape architecture.

Myth #3. Density means eliminating urban green space

FALSE: We can have both density & greener, healthier cities

Larger, denser cities are cleaner and more energy efficient than smaller, suburban towns. Suburban and rural towns may have immediate access to open space and wildlands outside city limits because of their more dispersed organization, but large cities can emulate natural ecologies.

Street trees, courtyards, green roofs and living walls, along with botanic gardens and parks provide a network of outdoor spaces that enhance the biological diversity of our cities and help provide essential infrastructure. This framework of planted spaces is able to capture and treat urban run-off, lower temperatures, improve air quality and provide resilience against climate change. Gardens and community farms also provide food and improve human health.

At CJM::LA, we help make our cities healthier and greener by advocating for more planting and functional outdoor space, especially in our densest multi-family housing projects; designing public parks, paseos, and green roofs; and improving city streetscapes.

transplanted Mexican fan palms line the stairs at Bella Riviera workforce homes in Santa Barbara, CA

plant pockets and climbing vines beautify the drive aisles at the East Beach Collection in Santa Barbara, CA  | architect: WHA

live roof at the Hilton Garden Inn in Goleta, CA

textural plantings line the sidewalk at the Arlington Village apartments in downtown Santa Barbara, CA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

entry plantings at homes designed for Habitat for Humanity of Southern Santa Barbara County in downtown Santa Barbara, CA

citrus trees within over-structure planters create a beautiful courtyard at Bella Riviera workforce homes

mediterranean plantings within raised planters help create opportunities for outdoor seating

neighborly gifts grown in downtown Santa Barbara, CA

Myth #4. Planting shouldn’t be done in a drought because plants use water

FALSE: Drought resilience is improved by planting smarter & better managing water resources

During a prolonged drought, there is less available water in the natural ecosystem, which negatively impacts human food and water security. Less water available in aquifers and other natural water bodies means less water for the agricultural industry and for our cities.

Landscape architects provide drought resilience by designing systems to comprehensively and efficiently manage water resources. By implementing bioretention basins, rainwater cisterns, efficient irrigation, greywater recycling and use of climate-adapted and native plants, we optimize our water resources and reallocate the potable water supply for drinking use.

It might seem counter-intuitive, but plants improve our ability to resist the impacts of drought by improving soil health, allowing soils to better capture and store water. Plants also sequester carbon, lower air temperatures, and if used in applications like green roofs, reduce building energy use and reduce the urban heat island effect. We shouldn’t eliminate plants because they use water. Instead, we should be smarter about how we supply plants with water and which plants we elect to use.

Want more info? See these additional links about drought resilience and using green infrastructure to mitigate the impacts of other hazards, like wildfires and climate change.

bioretention plants treat stormwater runoff at the Direct Relief headquarters in Santa Barbara, CA.

Myth #5. All landscape architects have beards.

TRUE. See what our team has to say about their facial hair.


Does your beard prefer using pencil, pens, or markers?
Prismacolor Col-Erase pencil in Carmine Red for drawing and Chartpak AD Markers for filling in those greys! – Courtney Jane Miller, PLA, ASLA


How does your beard help you professionally?
It takes notes during meetings, reminds me about upcoming appointments and makes coffee runs. -Nicole Horn, PLA, ASLA, MCP, MLA


If your beard was a plant what plant would it be?
My virtual beard? Looks like a severely hedged and humbled Rhaphiolepis indica. My actual beard? Probably more like a Marathon 1 Fescue -Cameron Hunt, PLA


What do you call a landscape architect without a beard?
An architect -Janet Shotwell


What has your beard taught you about landscape architecture?
My beard has taught me about site analysis and creating extremely detailed technical drawings. -Mariella Dentzel


WLAM | World Landscape Architecture Month

April is World Landscape Architecture Month (WLAM), a worldwide celebration of the impact this profession has on our daily lives.

As a part of our ongoing stewardship of the profession, this month we’re showcasing landscape architecture to the world and inviting the public to learn about what we do!  People hold profound connections to the spaces where they live, work and play.  This year we are celebrating the relationship between us and our environment.  We look forward to demonstrating the impact that thoughtful design solutions have on our collective quality of life.  Each week we’ll be posting something new, stay tuned!

 

 

We encourage you to join us in celebrating the landscape architectural profession by posting pictures from your neighborhood that highlight landscape architectural design with the hashtags #WLAM2020 and #LifeGrowsHere.
Be sure to tag @NationalASLA

 

TO LEARN MORE

Find out more about Landscape Architecture educational opportunities here.

Are you a K-12 educator interested in sharing landscape architecture with your students?
Learn more about Landscape Architecture education for teachers here

Are you hosting a virtual story time for your child?  Check this out:
Green Trees and Sam by Shannon Gapp, ASLA/Bolton & Menk.


7 Years In Business

On April 1, 2020 we celebrated 7 years in business!  What started as a sole proprietorship in 2013 has quickly grown to become a thriving team of creatives.  Today CJM::LA is a dynamic group of individuals who collaborate to produce design solutions that prioritize the environmental, economic and social sustainability of our communities.  In addition to our contributions to the built environment, we also support our local communities via board positions, mentorship programs, internship/shadowship opportunities, volunteerism and contributions to the educational and professional institutions that support the landscape architecture profession.  As we look toward the future, we are excited to expand our creative reach into new markets and develop new methods of executing our shared vision.

HERE’S A LOOK BACK

                                                                                                         
 

 
Thank you to our collaborators, clients, friends and families who helped us reach this milestone.  We are grateful for the opportunity to partner with such powerful minds!

For a closer look at our most recent work:: CJM-LA_Portfolio 2020


Hyatt Centric | Waterfront Construction Almost Complete!

Renovations are underway at what will soon be known as the Hyatt Mar Monte. As this project nears the end of the construction phase, the CJM::LA continues to oversee the revitalization of this historic hotel with Young Construction and Steve Hanson Landscaping.  This project combines layered textural plantings with historic Spanish Colonial detailing, ensuring a natural cohesion with the Santa Barbara waterfront.

demolition of the existing parking lot and impermeable brick paving

converting the existing parking lot into a pedestrian promenade and lobby placita

decorative columns taking shape!

framing the fountain

setting the mediterranean fan palm in place at the pool deck

converting the existing pool deck into a lush paradise

careful restoration of the original hotel entry

putting the finishing touches on our lobby placita fountain. tile provided by NS Ceramic.

 


5 Year Party Wrap-Up

Thank you to everyone who came out for our 5 YEAR PARTY and OPEN HOUSE last week!  We think we can all agree that the sprinkle cookies need to be made permanently available at our favorite coffee shop – The French Press.  Wine was provided by our friends at Municipal Winemakers, and the delicious fall farmer’s market spread was curated by the beautiful Julia Hauben.  Our new space is also currently home to a number of incredible paintings by Cathy Ellis.  Here are some pre-party photos::

The CJM::LA team really enjoyed catching up with our many friends, clients and collaborators – and showing off our new digs!  For those of you who weren’t aware, that swanky bartender was our very own Design Intern, Mariella Dentzel – the newest member of our team.  As we close out a successful 2018, we look forward to inviting more of you into our new home at 1221 State Street.


CELEBRATING FIVE YEARS IN BUSINESS!

We are celebrating an incredible FIVE YEARS in business in Santa Barbara!

OVER THE PAST 5 YEARS, THE CJM::LA TEAM HAS:

Grown our team from 1 to 6!
Supported 2 team members in obtaining professional licensure in the state of California.
Supported the professional development of 5 future Landscape Architects via our internship/shadowship program.
Contributed to the Santa Barbara and Ventura communities via Courtney’s position on the Architectural Board of Review and Nicole’s position on the Board of Directors at the Ventura Botanical Gardens.
Educated High School students about the Landscape Architecture profession via Katie’s involvement in the ACE Mentor Program.
Celebrated the opening of 21 new projects in the hospitality, multi-family residential, private residential, commercial, and parks & recreational markets.
Partnered with 4 local non-profits to provide safe, affordable housing to those in need; to improve the lives of people affected by poverty or emergencies, and to help communities realize their inherent potential to live fulfilling lives.
Fostered the contemporary art scene in Santa Barbara via our #DROUGHTRESISTANT series.
Designed both private and public spaces in a way that pushes the boundary of the expected.

AND…continued to #CHANGETHECONVERSATION!


AIASB ARCHITECTOURS 2018 | FEATURING NEW WORK BY CJM::LA

CJM::LA’s recently completed Arlington Village property, as well as our in-progress adaptive reuse property will be featured on this year’s AIASB ArchitecTours!

The Santa Barbara AIA’s annual ArchitecTours, a celebration of local architecture, will showcase the architectural fabric of downtown Santa Barbara, including new and recently completed properties in the downtown core.  The theme of this year’s ArchitecTours is ‘Rediscover Downtown Santa Barbara: Imagine How You Can Live, Work & Play’.

Arlington Village Apartments | 1330 Chapala Street

Adaptive Reuse | 418 State Street

Each of the twelve projects showcase the best of downtown and include a mix of commercial and residential projects demonstrating how we live in downtown Santa Barbara.  This event draws attention to the extraordinary architectural legacy in Santa Barbara and the value of well-designed architecture to its surrounding community.  Equally, ArchitecTours highlights the expertise that AIA architects (and Landscape Architects!) possess including a thorough understanding and expertise in urban design, sustainability, accessibility, structural improvements, building materials, and historic renovation.

The tour will be held this Saturday October 6th from 10am – 4pm and will culminate with a festive party.

Tickets are $80 for general public, $70 for AIA members and seniors, and $25 for students.

Tickets can be purchased here.


Crossrails Station Roof Garden

Read Full Article:
Crossrails Station Roof Garden
June 7, 2016
Landezine

Image courtesy of Jason Gairn

Image courtesy of Jason Gairn

Part of a new transit link for the city of London, the Crossrails Station roof garden celebrates the arrival of this new hub but also pay tribute to the neighborhood’s past. This exotic garden sits atop a five story mixed use commercial and transit center. The building’s exterior shell wraps the entire building with large openings above the garden creating a dynamic scene for visitors.

Click here to read more about this project.


The Power Station

Read Full Article:
The Power Station
May 17, 2016
Landezine

Image courtesy of Adolfo Cantu-Villareal

Image courtesy of Adolfo Cantu-Villareal

Hocker Design Group has transformed this local Dallas landmark into a new art space, residence and garden. Click here to read more about this project.


Coffice :: part coffee shop, office, and bar

Read Full Article:
Coffice / GASPARBONTA
May 10, 2016
Arch Daily

Image courtesy of Bálint Jaksa Photography

Image courtesy of Bálint Jaksa 

Located in the heart of Budapest, Hungary, Coffice is a collaborative initiative that brings together three distinct uses in an airy modern space. Part coffee shop, office, and bar, the open concept allows for a seamless transition between uses as the day progresses. By providing a series of open as well as closed areas, Coffice is able to fit the need of every type of person coming to it.

Click here to read more about this project.


San Francisco Roof Garden

Read Full Article:
2175 Market Street
April 28, 2016
Landezine

2175-Market-Street-03
Image courtesy of Patrik Argast

A LEED platinum project, this 88 unit apartment complex in San Francisco is sure to be the envy of its neighbors. Built to accommodate the influx of young tech workers and families moving into the urban core, the design maximizes outdoor entertaining spaces with terraces and a roof deck with eye catching color and form.

Click here to read more about this project.