WLAM | Landscape Architecture Myth Busting – Part 2

Part 2: More myth-busting as we continue to address common misconceptions about landscape architecture.

Myth #3. Density means eliminating urban green space

FALSE: We can have both density & greener, healthier cities

Larger, denser cities are cleaner and more energy efficient than smaller, suburban towns. Suburban and rural towns may have immediate access to open space and wildlands outside city limits because of their more dispersed organization, but large cities can emulate natural ecologies.

Street trees, courtyards, green roofs and living walls, along with botanic gardens and parks provide a network of outdoor spaces that enhance the biological diversity of our cities and help provide essential infrastructure. This framework of planted spaces is able to capture and treat urban run-off, lower temperatures, improve air quality and provide resilience against climate change. Gardens and community farms also provide food and improve human health.

At CJM::LA, we help make our cities healthier and greener by advocating for more planting and functional outdoor space, especially in our densest multi-family housing projects; designing public parks, paseos, and green roofs; and improving city streetscapes.

transplanted Mexican fan palms line the stairs at Bella Riviera workforce homes in Santa Barbara, CA

plant pockets and climbing vines beautify the drive aisles at the East Beach Collection in Santa Barbara, CA  | architect: WHA

live roof at the Hilton Garden Inn in Goleta, CA

textural plantings line the sidewalk at the Arlington Village apartments in downtown Santa Barbara, CA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

entry plantings at homes designed for Habitat for Humanity of Southern Santa Barbara County in downtown Santa Barbara, CA

citrus trees within over-structure planters create a beautiful courtyard at Bella Riviera workforce homes

mediterranean plantings within raised planters help create opportunities for outdoor seating

neighborly gifts grown in downtown Santa Barbara, CA

Myth #4. Planting shouldn’t be done in a drought because plants use water

FALSE: Drought resilience is improved by planting smarter & better managing water resources

During a prolonged drought, there is less available water in the natural ecosystem, which negatively impacts human food and water security. Less water available in aquifers and other natural water bodies means less water for the agricultural industry and for our cities.

Landscape architects provide drought resilience by designing systems to comprehensively and efficiently manage water resources. By implementing bioretention basins, rainwater cisterns, efficient irrigation, greywater recycling and use of climate-adapted and native plants, we optimize our water resources and reallocate the potable water supply for drinking use.

It might seem counter-intuitive, but plants improve our ability to resist the impacts of drought by improving soil health, allowing soils to better capture and store water. Plants also sequester carbon, lower air temperatures, and if used in applications like green roofs, reduce building energy use and reduce the urban heat island effect. We shouldn’t eliminate plants because they use water. Instead, we should be smarter about how we supply plants with water and which plants we elect to use.

Want more info? See these additional links about drought resilience and using green infrastructure to mitigate the impacts of other hazards, like wildfires and climate change.

bioretention plants treat stormwater runoff at the Direct Relief headquarters in Santa Barbara, CA.

Myth #5. All landscape architects have beards.

TRUE. See what our team has to say about their facial hair.


Does your beard prefer using pencil, pens, or markers?
Prismacolor Col-Erase pencil in Carmine Red for drawing and Chartpak AD Markers for filling in those greys! – Courtney Jane Miller, PLA, ASLA


How does your beard help you professionally?
It takes notes during meetings, reminds me about upcoming appointments and makes coffee runs. -Nicole Horn, PLA, ASLA, MCP, MLA


If your beard was a plant what plant would it be?
My virtual beard? Looks like a severely hedged and humbled Rhaphiolepis indica. My actual beard? Probably more like a Marathon 1 Fescue -Cameron Hunt, PLA


What do you call a landscape architect without a beard?
An architect -Janet Shotwell


What has your beard taught you about landscape architecture?
My beard has taught me about site analysis and creating extremely detailed technical drawings. -Mariella Dentzel


San Francisco Roof Garden

Read Full Article:
2175 Market Street
April 28, 2016
Landezine

2175-Market-Street-03
Image courtesy of Patrik Argast

A LEED platinum project, this 88 unit apartment complex in San Francisco is sure to be the envy of its neighbors. Built to accommodate the influx of young tech workers and families moving into the urban core, the design maximizes outdoor entertaining spaces with terraces and a roof deck with eye catching color and form.

Click here to read more about this project.


Over 1,000 perforated aluminium shingles for Texas park sculpture

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Marc Fornes uses over 1,000 perforated aluminium shingles for Texas park sculpture
April 26, 2016
Dezeen

spineway-marc-fornes-theverymany-architecture-infrastructure-public-art-san-antonio-texas-usa-aluminium_dezeen_936_5
Image courtesy of Dezeen

The French and American studio of Marc Fornes has created its first permanent installation in the United States. Located at the gateway of a century old park in San Antonio, the sculpture is made up of 1,009 perforated aluminum shingles fastened together by 19,429 rivets. The digitally designed installation serves as a prime example of exploratory structural design to create iconic public spaces.

Click here to read more about this cutting edge design.


San Diego Micro-living

Read Full Article:
San Diego Teaches Us How Micro-Living Can Thrive
April 21, 2016
Dwell

little_by_little-portrait-kayak-mezzanine-high_ceilings
Image courtesy of Ye Rin Mok

Hector Perez, a Woodbury University professor, rallied together a team of architects to design a small urban infill project in the historic Barrio Logan neighborhood of San Diego. The development was supposed to be a series of nine infill projects, but was unable to complete them due to the economic downturn. However, the first lot was developed into a double-height, mixed-use building of Perez’s design, where, in less than 4,000 square feet, he has created eight live-work units, each with a private outdoor space.

Click here to read more about this cool California contemporary design.


Urban Coffee Farm

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Urban Coffee Farm
April 14, 2016
Landezine

UrbanCoffee_15Image courtesy of Bonnie Savage

Built for the Melbourne Food and Wine Festival, the Urban Coffee Farm & Brew Bar is a beautiful example of bringing a functional landscape into the urban core. Melbourne is famous for its coffee culture, and design studio HASSEL wanted to bring the story of coffee’s growth and production into the same space as it is consumed. Sitting amongst coffee plants, users will be able to learn more about coffee’s journey from rainforest slopes to the cup they have in their hand.

Click here to read more about this fun and innovative installation.

 


Hollister Village | Under Construction

Spa and Clubhouse Construction
Spa and Clubhouse Construction

Construction on our Hollister Village project is well underway as we enter into fall.  Located in Goleta, CA this mixed-use project will provide a retail shopping center as well as 266 apartments to the Goleta community.  Courtney has worked on this project for almost seven years, bringing the project from conceptual design through construction documents and now construction observation.  We are proud to provide this much-needed rental housing to a community in dire need of available units!

To view photos of the construction progress, click here.


Hollister Village - Landscape Architecture California

HOLLISTER VILLAGE

Hollister Village

HOLLISTER VILLAGE

Goleta, CA
Under Construction


Project Type

Mixed Use, Apartments and Retail

Client

Westar Associates

Collaborators

Penfield & Smith | Civil Engineering
Architects Orange
Menemsha | Architecture
JMPE | Electrical Engineering + Lighting Design
Sweeney & Associates | Irrigation Design

Santa Barbara Landscape Architecture: Hollister Village
Landscape Architecture: Hollister Village
HV_3-R
HV_4